Gutter Accessories

Gutter Collector Box

A box gutter is a type of gutter that sits between two parallel parts of a roof. The box gutter between two roofs acts as a valley between the two surfaces and collects drain water. However, box gutters should not be confused with valley gutters. Rainwater from both roofs (or parts of the roof) feeds into the box gutter.

The box gutter drains the water away via down pipe nozzles or sumps that have downpipes built into them. A box gutter aims to channel rainwater from the roof to external parts of the building through a down pipe or the box gutter overflow system. Box guttering systems typically feature on the roofs of commercial buildings. However, they are also in some residential homes.

WHAT DOES A BOX GUTTER LOOK LIKE?

Most tradespeople will be aware of what is a box gutter, and what it looks like; however, it’s not common knowledge to most as they are not visible from the outside. Box gutters are typically long rectangular-shaped channel-like structure that sits within the framework of the building. Box gutters have a flat, square-shaped base and high sides, much like the shape of a long rectangular box. The size of a box gutter between two roofs will depend on the size, shape, and type of property. The best box gutter material to use is stainless steel or Colourbond for its durability.

 

Whilst box gutters were initially used in older commercial establishments and between terrace homes, they have risen in popularity in recent years for cosmetic purposes. Many modern homes or other commercial buildings use box gutters vs regular gutters. Box gutters do not sit on the house’s perimeter or establishment and are not visible from the outside of the property. Consequently, they can also be referred to as “concealed gutters” and create a seamless finish in buildings.

BOX GUTTER DETAIL AND DESIGN

If you’re learning about what is a box gutter, it’s essential to consider the design of a box guttering system. Good attention to box gutter detail and design will lead to a discrete gutter system that is fully functional and looks great from the outside. However, poor design will lead to poor box gutter overflow management. A well-built box gutter will have a flat base with a full-width outlet at both ends. Box gutters should have enough falls and sumps along the length of the gutter to effectively collect the water and wash it down the drainpipe. A box gutter overflow system should also be in place for extreme weather conditions, or any fails in the box guttering systems. The overflow system means that water will overflow externally rather than flood the roof cavity.

BOX GUTTERS VS REGULAR GUTTERS
When understanding what is a box gutter, it’s essential to consider the difference between a box gutter and a regular gutter. The technical name for a standard gutter is an eaves box gutter. An eaves gutter is a type of gutter system fixed to the eave or fascia of the roof.

They catch the water that runs off the sides of the roof and drain the water away through a drainpipe. Eaves gutters are the most common type of gutter that is visible on residential properties. There are three distinct differences between box gutters and eaves gutters, which we will outline below:

Box gutters are concealed from the outside, whereas the eaves box gutter is visible from the outside of the building. Box gutters are fixed within the building’s structure, whereas eaves gutters are fixed to the perimeter of a roof. Box gutters are most commonly found on commercial buildings; however, they are occasionally added to residential properties for cosmetic purposes.

Gutter Guards

Screen

Screen guards feature a wire or a plastic grid that blocks leaves from entering the gutter through. They’re easy to install by lifting the bottom row of roof shingles and sliding the edges of the gutter screens beneath the shingles along the entire length of the gutter so that the weight of the shingles holds the screen in place. Screen gutter guards are an inexpensive option and offer the simplest installation—often, no tools are needed.

Gutter screens are not screwed down and so maybe dislodged by high winds or knocked out from under shingles by falling branches. Additionally, prying up the lower row of roof shingles to install slip-under gutter guards voids certain roof warranties. Contact the shingle manufacturer before installing this type of gutter guard if you have concerns.

Micro-Mesh

Micro-mesh gutter guards are similar to screens, allowing water to run through small holes while blocking twigs, pine needles, and debris. They require one of three simple installation methods: slipping the edge under the first row of roof shingles, snapping the guard directly onto the top of the gutter, or attaching a flange to the fascia (the vertical strip just above the top of the gutter).

Micro-mesh gutter guards are effective at blocking even small bits of debris, such as blowing sand, while allowing rain to flow through. Unlike other gutter guards, these mesh guards may require occasional cleaning with a hose sprayer and scrub brush to clear ultrafine debris from the mesh holes

Reverse Curve

Reverse-curve gutter guards are made from lightweight metal or molded plastic. Water flows over the top and around a downward curve before dropping into the gutter beneath. Leaves and debris slide right off the edge and fall to the ground below. These gutter guards work well for keeping leaves and debris out of the gutter, even in yards with numerous trees.

Reverse-curve gutter guards are more expensive than mesh guards and screen options. They’re fewer DIY-friendly than other types of gutter guards and must attach at the correct angle to the roof’s fascia. If not installed properly, water can run over the edge, rather than following the reverse curve into the gutter. Since they install above the existing guttering, they can appear like full gutter covers from the ground, so it’s advised to look for a product that matches the color and aesthetic of the home.

Brush

Brush-style gutter guards are essentially oversize pipe cleaners that rest inside the gutter, preventing large debris from falling into the gutter and causing clogs. Simply cut the brush to the proper length and slide it into the gutter. The easy installation and inexpensive price make brush-style gutter guards a popular option for DIYers on a budget.

This type of gutter guard is typically composed of a thick metal wire core with polypropylene bristles extending from the center. The guards require no screws or connections to the rain gutters, and the metal wire core is flexible, allowing the gutter guards to be bent to fit around corners or unusually shaped stormwater drainage systems. These features make it easier for DIYers to install these gutter guards without professional assistance.

Foam

Another easy-to-use option is essentially a triangular block of foam that sits in the gutter. One flat side lies to the back of the gutter, another flat side faces up to the top of the gutter to prevent debris from entering, and the third flat side lies diagonally in the gutter, which allows water and small debris to flow through the drainage system.

These gutter guards are inexpensive and easy to install, making them a great choice for DIYers. The foam can be cut to the proper length, and the guards don’t require nails or screws to remain in place, so there’s less risk of damage or leaks. However, they aren’t the best for locations that experience high levels of precipitation because heavy rain can quickly saturate the foam, causing the gutters to overflow.

Gutter Leaf Screens

All gutters carry water away from your home, but only Gutters OK does it with a patented, debris shedding design that is better than any other gutter guard on the market today. No other gutter system is designed to provide  level of quality protection, eliminating the problems homeowners worry most about:

  • Rotting fascia and soffit 
  • Damaged foundation
  • Basement flooding
  • Damaged driveway
  • Landscape erosion
  • Damaged roof
  • Mold and mildew
  • Insects and pests

Inspect. Measure. Install.

Gutter Leaf Screens are custom fit by our professional installers to the exact specifications of your home. No need to worry about performance, fit, or unsightly seams. With a gutter leaf guard enjoy clog-free gutters guaranteed. Get it and forget it!

COMMON GUTTER PROBLEMS & SOLUTIONS

I LIVE IN A HOME WITH A LOT OF TREES AND HAVE WASTED MY MONEY ON SEVERAL DIFFERENT EXPENSIVE GUTTER GUARDS. HOW DO I KNOW THAT A MICRO-MESH GUARD WILL WORK?

Since 2005, we have sold millions upon millions of feet of mesh gutter guards. Mesh guards take large volumes of water yet prevent anything as small as a piece of sand from entering. We also stand by our product with a simple 20-year guarantee. If your gutters are ever to clog when protected by our premiere mesh guard, we will refund your purchase price.

WHAT ARE SIGNS THAT MY GUTTERS ARE CLOGGED AND SHOULD BE CLEANED? HOW OFTEN SHOULD I CLEAN THEM?

Overflowing water after a storm is the biggest sign that your gutters may have a clog. There may also be visible and overflowing debris. It is recommended that you get your gutters cleaned at least twice a year, specifically once in the spring and once in the fall.

IS A MICRO-MESH GUTTER GUARD A MAINTENANCE-FREE PRODUCT?

There is no such thing as a maintenance-free gutter or leaf guard. If a representative from any gutter guard company in the world makes such a claim, RUN FAST. Your gutters are the defense against extensive water damage. Our job is to protect your home from having clogged gutters and to prevent you from having to clean the muck from the interior. Mostly, the product will self shed with the wind, but in some homes, the debris might have to be easily removed from the surface.

DO YOU CLEAN UNDERGROUND DRAINAGE?

Your home’s main gutter system gathers rainwater from the roofline and controls its path down the house to the ground. Underground gutter drains can be helpful for moving the water away from the foundation even further by attaching to the downspouts on your home and draining underground. Cleaning them is similar to a process used to clear debris from the side gutter pipes on your house. Some of our divisions provide this service but not all.

MY GUTTERS ARE OVERFLOWING. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN, AND HOW DO I FIX IT?

This means that your gutters are most likely clogged. The build-up of leaves and debris can cause this. When there is a substantial amount of rain and your gutters are backed up, the water will begin to overflow. Your downspouts can also get clogged. If the water cannot flow out of the downspout, it will back up and overflow from your gutter. Clogged or leaky gutters are one of the biggest causes of basement leaks, mold, and other foundation problems. A gutter cleaning can solve flooding. Cleaning them at least twice a year is highly recommended.

HOW DO I MAINTAIN MY GUTTERS IN WINTER?

A gutter in the winter will collect snow and ice. The more snow we have, the more snow in the gutter. As the sun comes out and melts the snow, the gutter will begin draining water. In some instances, homeowners may get icicles as a result of freezing and thawing. Some houses will even get ice damming. Ice damming is when ice travels under your shingles and as it melts it can get into your home causing major damage. Ice damming occurs mostly in homes that do not have a vented soffit or ridge vent on their roof. In the fall when preparing for winter, be sure to clean the gutters of debris, inspect seams and anchors, check for structural damage, and check your downspouts. Having a proper cleaning right before winter will help with this winter build-up.

WHY DO I NEED RAIN GUTTERS?

Good rain guttering is an integral part of a home’s exterior. Old, damaged, or defective rain gutters can cause a lot of damage. When a gutter clogs, the water is not diverted properly and overflows into either the house or foundation. This can cause wood rot, foundation problems, and landscaping erosion. In addition to the damage to your home, a rain gutter clogged with soggy leaves and debris is the perfect breeding ground for mold and mildew, as well as mosquitoes and other pests. People often think that rain gutters have to be on their homes but are never sure why. Rain rolling off of your roof especially a second-story roof can really punish the ground below. If there are several rounds of steady rains, this rainwater can carve a small trench on the sides of your home. Rain gutters divert this water away and release it slowly in designated areas of your yard so that this water can be properly drained away. Without rain gutters, yards can flood, erode very quickly from the massive amounts of runoff, and other things if you didn’t have gutters.